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Art

Subject Mapping – Art and Design

The National Curriculum says:
Art, craft and design embody some of the highest forms of human creativity. A high-quality art and design education should engage, inspire and challenge pupils, equipping them with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. As pupils progress, they should be able to think critically and develop a more rigorous understanding of art and design. They should also know how art and design both reflect and shape our history, and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation. By the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant programme of study.

In order to achieve this by the end of Key Stage One at Mudeford Infant School:

Pupils will be able to appreciate, discuss and respond to a range of art using appropriate vocabulary. They will be confident in the selection and use of a range of media, materials and techniques effectively to enable them to express themselves creatively.

Aims of an Artist leaving our school
  • Children will:produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences
  • develop proficiency in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques
  • be able to reflect on their work using accurate vocabulary related to art and design
  • be able to evaluate and develop their work through their knowledge of different art techniques
  • know about the work of some great artists, craft makers and designers
Knowledge Acquiring 
  • to use a range of materials creatively to design and make products
  • to use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination
  • to develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space
  • about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between different practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work
Skills Development
  • Using the principles of ‘Austin’s Butterfly’ children will select from a range of skills and techniques that they have experienced in order to develop and improve their ideas creatively.
  • Children will reflect on the effectiveness of their approach in relation to their own design ideas and that of other artists, craft makers and designers
  • Children will progress from exploratory opportunities with media and materials towards the development of specified skills and techniques in order to achieve their own creative outcomes
Sequence of Learning – When and how do we facilitate this learning for Artists in our school?
Reception Year 1 Year 2
Children will explore and create using a range of media and materials through their Plan-Work-Recall opportunities.   Children will be taught to handle and use pencils, coloured pencils, crayons, felt tips, pastels and chalks effectively for drawing for a range of purposes in both directed and child initiated sessions. Children will explore paint for a range of purposes and will be able to use appropriate techniques for paintbrushes, rollers and printing materials.

They will experiences and experiment with shape and form using resources including play dough, clay, junk modelling, construction e.g. poddley, lego, wooden blocks, weaving.   Children will name and explore colours in a variety of contexts and will begin to develop an understanding of colour mixing (primary and secondary colours). During the Animal Adventure project children will be introduced to the work of Matisse and will create their own interpretations of ‘The Snail’ as well as exploring and recreating animal patterns. Through colour mixing opportunities in the Around the World project, children will be introduced to the work of Mondrian and use their knowledge of colour mixing to create their own piece in the style of Modrian. During the Autumn and Harvest project children will explore the work of Andy Goldsworthy in the outside environment and will create their own sculptures.

Children will explore and create using a range of media and materials through their Plan-Work-Recall opportunities.   During the Autumn and Harvest project children will learn about the work of Archimboldo and will recreate and design their own interpretation of his work focusing on form, shape and space.   Children will apply their knowledge and skills of using pastels and paints to create their own composition of the solar system in the Destination Unknown project. They will be taught the techniques for using papier mache and charcoal and will use this to create their own moonscape. They will develop their knowledge of colours and mixing to include black and white for shade and tone. During The English Country Garden project, children will learn about the work of Van Gough focusing on ‘The Sunflowers’ piece. Children will explore texture and colour using paint to recreate his work.   Children will carry out observational drawings of plants and flowers. They will look at the work of the designer Cath Kidston and will create their own piece towards a class project of bunting selecting their media e.g. fabric pens, pastels, paints. Children will explore, create and respond using the skills and knowledge acquired in Reception and Year 1 making choices about the media and materials they wish to use in their Plan-Work-Recall sessions. During the Pirate Island project children will be shown the techniques for using mod roc alongside a range of other media for sculpture to create their own elements for their under the sea scene. Children will develop their skills in line, pattern and colour whilst designing their own creatures to inhabit the island. The Art Beat project will give children the opportunity to learn about a range of famous artists and their work including Monet (water colours, pastels and pencils), Warhol (printing), Lichenstein (printing and colour), Picasso (paint, line and colour), Goldsworthy (sculpture, space, colour and form), Clarice Cliff (pattern and colour), Miro (line, colour and space). Children will apply the skills they have developed selecting media to create their own representation of the work of these artists. They will be encouraged to use their knowledge of colour mixing and shading independently and for purpose. Children will explore aboriginal art and Batik (Miro) and use these techniques in the development of their own pieces.
 
Design and Technology

Design and Technology

The National Curriculum says:
Design and technology is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject. Using creativity and imagination, pupils design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. They acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art. Pupils learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world. High-quality design and technology education makes an essential contribution to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of the nation.

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They should work in a range of relevant contexts [for example, the home and school, gardens and playgrounds, the local community, industry and the wider environment].

As part of their work with food, pupils should be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life.

By the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant programme of study.

In order to achieve this by the end of Key Stage One at Mudeford Infant School:

Pupils will be able to use their creativity and imagination to design and make products that meet specified criteria applying skills from a range of curriculum areas. Pupils will develop their skills as learners by being resourceful (Francesca Fox) and resilient (Tommy Tortoise). Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils will be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to design and make purposeful products.

Pupils will develop a basic understanding of nutrition, healthy eating and food preparation to promote a lifelong love of cooking.

How do we bring this to life?
  • Design and make products for a specified purpose and audience related to project outcomes.
  • Visitors to the school who share their knowledge and experience within specified fields.
  • Growing produce in ‘The Learning Garden’ for observing, tasting, selling.
Knowledge Acquiring – explore, find out, discover, research, understand
Design:

  • design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology

Make:

  • select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing]
  • select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics

Evaluate:

  • explore and evaluate a range of existing products
  • evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria

Technical knowledge:

  • build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable
  • explore and use mechanisms [for example, levers, sliders, wheels and axles], in their products.

Cooking and Nutrition:

  • use the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes
  • understand where food comes from.
Skills Development – problem solve, justify, reason, evaluate, practise
  • Using technical knowledge in building structures and mechanisms children will design products to solve problems.
  • Children will use skills in evaluation to develop and improve their designs according to set criteria.
  • Children will have opportunities to perform practical tasks and practise skills across a range of project related contexts.
  • Children will progress from exploratory opportunities with construction materials, textiles and ingredients towards the development of specified skills and techniques in order to achieve their own outcomes
Sequence of Learning – When and how do we facilitate this learning for Designers in our school?
Reception Year 1 Year 2
Initially children will communicate their design ideas through discussion with adults and peers, working towards pictorial representation and labelling by the end of the summer term.   Children will design and make products based on their interests and experiences. They will be given opportunities to explore and create with a range of tools and equipment including scissors, hole punches glue and tape learning how to use these safely and responsibly. Exploration and accuracy of using tools and techniques will be supported by adults through continuous provision in the Creative Area. Children will have opportunities to explore, experience and design using a range of materials including wooden blocks, duplo, junk modelling and will be able to select and use appropriate materials for their own design criteria.   Using ongoing discussion with adults and in Recall Time sessions children will be encouraged to evaluate and plan for the development and improvement of products. Through their own experiences they will begin to gain a basic technical understanding of design in building stable structures.   Children will be given opportunities to sample different types of foods and discuss its role as part of a healthy diet during the Handa’s Surprise fruit tasting in the Around the World project. They will design and create their own pizza’s in the Pizzeria Role Play in the Around the World project. Children will draw templates to communicate their design ideas, label key components and list tools and materials required. Children will be given design criteria to create purposeful, functional and appealing products such as instruments for pre-school children during the Shake, Rattle and Roll project. Children will be taught how to use tools effectively for a range of purposes including scissors, hole punches, staplers glue and tape. At Christmas children will be taught to use a drill safely and effectively in order to create a Christmas decoration. In science children will develop a sound knowledge of the properties of materials in order to design and build a bridge in The Troll project. They will explore and experiment with their constructions and choices in order to develop technical knowledge of how to make structures stronger, stiffer and more stable. During the design and build process children will have an opportunity to reflect and revise their ideas in ‘The Test Station’. Children evaluate products independently reflecting on success in relation to design criteria and areas they would choose to develop if they were to undertake the activities again. As part of The Mudeford Bake Off project children will further understand the basic principles of a healthy and balanced diet.   They will acquire knowledge of where food comes from. They will design and create a competition entry for a healthy snack and will be able to identify the origin of the ingredients. Under adult supervision children will follow a recipe to make Easter Biscuits linking an understanding of Christian symbols with the technical skills of cooking. Children will communicate their design ideas through drawing and labelling templates and justifying their choices for their selection of tools and materials. Children will explore and evaluate existing products that include mechanisms before being taught how to make these for themselves as part of their under the sea scene creation. Children will continue to develop an understanding of how to select and use tools effectively for a range of purposes including saws and glue guns when creating their sea scenes. As part of the Brilliant Britain project children will be expected to follow design criteria that enables them to apply their developing technical knowledge in creating bridges and tunnels during a problem solving river crossing activity. They will also apply their knowledge of the properties of materials to build houses for the Great Fire of London e.g. transparent windows and textile bedding.   Children will develop their skills in making structures stronger, stiffer and more stable during their 3D map building of Christchurch during the Creepy Christchurch project to ensure that geographical features are free standing. Children will apply the characteristics of being an effective learner through the ongoing evaluation of product making as they solve problems in order to be successful in meeting design criteria. As part of the Food Glorious Food project children will continue to understand the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet including the role of protein, carbohydrates and vitamins in keeping the body healthy. They will use this knowledge to design a three-course menu for the Mudeford Italian Restaurant. Children will learn how to use peelers, knives and melon ballers safely during their preparation of the meal.
Aims of a Designer leaving our school
Children will:

  • Be confident to use their technical knowledge in designing and making products
  • Be able to evaluate their products and those of others against set design criteria
  • Have a basic understanding of a healthy diet and be able to apply this in menu planning
Geography

Geography

The National Curriculum says:
A high-quality geography education should inspire in pupils a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. Teaching should equip pupils with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes. As pupils progress, their growing knowledge about the world should help them to deepen their understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes, and of the formation and use of landscapes and environments. Geographical knowledge, understanding and skills provide the frameworks and approaches that explain how the Earth’s features at different scales are shaped, interconnected and change over time.

In order to achieve this by the end of Key Stage One the National Curriculum says:

Pupils should develop knowledge about the world, the United Kingdom and their locality. They should understand basic subject-specific vocabulary relating to human and physical geography and begin to use geographical skills, including first-hand observation, to enhance their locational awareness.

How do we bring this to life?
  • Visits around the local area – coastline, marshlands, river, woodlands, town centre, leisure centre, harbour, farm
  • Use the Learning Garden to explore physical changes
  • Use Google Earth on the IFP to take children on journeys around the world
  • Use YouTube to provide awe and wonder about places in the world
  • Use 2D and 3D maps of our school, local areas and other places in the world to plot routes
  • Interactive classroom displays to build on children’s experiences and interests
  • Providing opportunities for children to rehearse their geographical skills through storytelling and Plan, Work, Recall opportunities
Knowledge Acquiring – explore, find out, discover, research, understand
Locational knowledge:

  • name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans
  • name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas

Place knowledge:

  • understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the United Kingdom, and of a small area in a contrasting non-European country

Human and physical geography:

  • identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom and the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles
  • use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to:
  • key physical features, including: beach, cliff, coast, forest, hill, mountain, sea, ocean, river, soil, valley, vegetation, season and weather
  • key human features, including: city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office, port, harbour and shop
Skills Development – problem solve, justify, reason, evaluate, practise
Geographical skills and fieldwork:

  • use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the United Kingdom and its countries, as well as the countries, continents and oceans studied at this key stage
  • use simple compass directions (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language [for example, near and far; left and right], to describe the location of features and routes on a map
  • use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features; devise a simple map; and use and construct basic symbols in a key
  • use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of their school and its grounds and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment.
Sequence of Learning – When and how do we facilitate this learning for Geographers in our school?
Reception Year 1 Year 2
Children in Reception will develop an awareness of other countries and cultures from around the world as part of their Around the World Project.  Children will use maps, You Tube and Google Earth to locate countries and view traditions and experiences from the perspective of other children.  Using the World Map display children will plot stories from other cultures, children’s holidays throughout the year and key age-appropriate current affairs e.g. World Cup, Olympics, Religious Festivals.  Children will have first hand experiences of the local physical environment exploring the features of a woodland, farm and coastal location linked to key geographical vocabulary.  Through story-telling, small world and construction play children will begin to develop an understanding of map skills and with adult support will developing mathematical skills of positional and directional language relating to maps.  Children will develop basic coding skills using Bee Bots exploring maps and designing their own linked to projects.  Children will visit the Learning Garden each month to explore seasonal changes and weather patterns and will record their observations in a whole class journal.  Children will refer back to the previous months to make comparisons. Children in Year 1 will begin naming and locating the continents and oceans of the world within their Destination Unknown Project.  They will look at maps, atlases, globes, Google Earth and internet resources to view the earth from space then track the first voyage of Christopher Columbus.  Children will create a map with adult support naming and labelling the continents and oceans.  Using the World Map and UK Map display children will plot relevant aspects of projects e.g. key dinosaur find in the Dinosaur Rumpus project, children’s holidays throughout the year and key age-appropriate current affairs e.g. World Cup, Olympics, Religious Festivals.  Children will be introduced to the four countries of the UK at the start of their In an English Country Garden project.  Children will develop their knowledge of the features of a range of environments including visits to a forest and heathland area.  Children will make comparisons between the new location visited and that of the coastal visit from Reception.  Children will begin to understand the difference between human and physical features making explicit links during The Troll project designing maps using appropriate geographical vocabulary.  In an English Country Garden project children will make comparisons of human and physical features using their visit to the forest and heathland, coastal visit from Reception and observations of their immediate locality in Mudeford.  Children will continue to develop their knowledge of positional and directional language in maths and will be supported in using this accurately in map making activities and Purple Mash coding activities.  Children will visit the Learning Garden each month to explore seasonal changes and weather patterns and will record their observations in a whole class journal, mapping key observations whole class.  Children will have further opportunities to add their own key observations to the journal as part of Plan, Work Recall provision.  Children will refer back to the previous months to make comparisons. Children in Year 2 will use maps, globes and atlases to independently locate and name the continents and oceans of the world, equator and poles during the Pirate Island project.  Using the World Map display children will plot relevant aspects of projects e.g. comparing Christchurch to Whistler in Canada, children’s holidays throughout the year and key age-appropriate current affairs e.g. sporting events, Religious Festivals, natural occurrences.  During the Brilliant Britain project children will learn about significant features and the location of the four countries and capital cities of the UK and will be able to mark these independently on a map.  Children will broaden their knowledge of human and physical features using aerial photographs, in a range of environments and apply this to creating 2D and 3D maps of Christchurch following a school visit.  Children will expand and apply their knowledge of geographical vocabulary to design and label maps (including simple keys) during the Pirate Island project and begin to explain the significance of geographical features.  Children will develop their knowledge of positional and directional language through use of a compass and apply these skills during Active Maths sessions and making simple programs in coding sessions.  Children will visit the Learning Garden each month to explore and reflect on seasonal changes and weather patterns and will record their observations in an individual journal.  During the Budding Botanist project children will use a plan perspective of the school grounds in a Learning Garden session to map the Summer Fayre stalls including their plant stall.
Aims of a Geographer leaving our school
Children will:

  • Have a secure locational knowledge about the continents and oceans of the world and the countries and capitals of the UK, including be able to compare geographical features with contrasting locations.
  • Be able to confidently talk about similarities and differences between local areas with contrasting geographical features using appropriate geographical vocabulary based on first hand experiences.
  • Be able to accurately create and follow a simple map with a key.
  • Have observed patterns of seasonal change and will be able to discuss the impact of these on their immediate environment.
  • Be able to use positional and directional language in a geographical context.
History

History

The National Curriculum says:
A high-quality history education will help pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. It should inspire pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past. Teaching should equip pupils to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. History helps pupils to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time.

Pupils will:

  • know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world
  • know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind
  • gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’
  • understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses
  • understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed
  • gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales.

In order to achieve this by the end of Key Stage One the National Curriculum says:

Pupils should develop an awareness of the past, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time. They should know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods. They should use a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms. They should ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events. They should understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented.

In planning to ensure the progression described above through teaching about the people, events and changes outlined below, teachers are often introducing pupils to historical periods that they will study more fully at key stages 2 and 3.

How do we bring this to life?
  • Re-creating models and exploring artefacts from past times
  • Introducing children to different composers and genre from different time periods in music teaching
  • Watch performances and interact with key historical events through drama.
  • Interactive classroom displays to build on children’s experiences and interests
  • Use You Tube to create awe and wonder about historical events
  • Visit to explore things of local historical importance around Christchurch (Y2)
Knowledge Acquiring – explore, find out, discover, research, understand
Pupils should be taught about:

  • changes within living memory. Where appropriate, these should be used to reveal aspects of change in national life
  • events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally [for example, the Great Fire of London, the first aeroplane flight or events commemorated through festivals or anniversaries]
  • the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. Some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods [for example, Elizabeth I and Queen Victoria, Christopher Columbus and Neil Armstrong, William Caxton and Tim Berners-Lee, Pieter Bruegel the Elder and LS Lowry, Rosa Parks and Emily Davison, Mary Seacole and/or Florence Nightingale and Edith Cavell]
  • significant historical events, people and places in their own locality.
Skills Development – problem solve, justify, reason, evaluate, practise
  • Use key artefacts and sources as stimulus to problem solve, reason and evaluate about the relevance of historical events
  • Use language linked to the passing of time confidently and accurately
  • Be able to use their knowledge of historical events to be able to reflect on the impact they have had on modern life
Sequence of Learning – When and how do we facilitate this learning for Historians in our school?
Reception Year 1 Year 2
Children will begin to develop a historical understanding as part of their learning about Knowledge and Understanding of the World.  As part of the Celebrations project children will begin to develop an understanding of basic timelines thinking about key events in their lives so far e.g. birthdays, weddings, holidays.  Using baby photos children will think about the changes that have taken place over time and the things they can do now that they couldn’t do then.  Children will learn key vocabulary about the passing of time through SAFE Maths activities e.g. today, tomorrow, yesterday, day, morning, afternoon.  Using the historical timeline display children will plot key events from their school year in Reception and of personal significance.  As part of the RE curriculum children will mark ‘a long time ago’ as the Birth of Jesus on the timeline. Children will learn about events beyond living memory and significant individuals as part of the Destination Unknown project comparing the first voyage of Christopher Columbus and the first moon landing by Neil Armstrong.  Children will explore the relevance of these events in modern life and consider other significant individuals with in similar fields e.g. Tim Peake and Ellen McCarthy.  Children will learn about the key finds by Mary Anning within the Lyme Regis area as part of the Dinosaur Rumpus project.  Children will learn key vocabulary about the passing of time through SAFE Maths activities e.g. days of the week, months of the year.  Using the historical timeline display children will plot key events from their school year in Year 1, the transition from Reception and key historical events taught as well as relevant national and international events of interest to the children (e.g. links to composers). Children will build on their understanding of events beyond living memory and significant individuals as part of their Brilliant Britain project.  Children will learn about the life and times of Samuel Pepys and changes in approaches to town planning and house building as a result of The Great Fire of London. Children will learn about individuals who have had a significant impact on modern life in Britain e.g. Brunel and Beatrix Potter.  During the Creepy Christchurch project children will visit local sites of historical significance and learn about how and why they were important in their time.  Through story mapping and drama children demonstrate their knowledge about The Battle of Mudeford and the role that significant individuals played.  Using the historical timeline display children will plot key events from their time at Mudeford Infants and key historical events taught as well as relevant national and international events of interest to the children (e.g. links to composers and artists).  In addition children will learn about the importance of Remembrance including Remembrance Day and Memorials e.g. The Monument.
Aims of a Historian leaving our school
Children will:

  • Have an understanding of some key historical figures and events that have had an impact locally, nationally and internationally.
  • Have a developing understanding of historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives
  • Have a basic understanding of fact and opinion when reviewing historical sources
  • Have a historical perspective on change within their own life time and beyond
Computing

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Music

Music

The National Curriculum says:
Music is a universal language that embodies one of the highest forms of creativity. A high quality music education should engage and inspire pupils to develop a love of music and their talent as musicians, and so increase their self-confidence, creativity and sense of achievement. As pupils progress, they should develop a critical engagement with music, allowing them to compose, and to listen with discrimination to the best in the musical canon.  By the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant programme of study.

In order to achieve this by the end of Key Stage One at Mudeford Infant School:

Pupils will perform, listen to, review and evaluate music across historical periods, genres, styles and traditions, including the works of the great composers and musicians.  They will learn to sing and to use their voices, begin to create and compose music on their own and with others.  Children will understand and explore how music is created, including through the inter-related dimensions: pitch, duration, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure and appropriate musical notations.

How do we bring this to life?
  • A vibrant musical curriculum, providing progression in the learning of musical skills, understanding and knowledge, linked to our creative curriculum where appropriate and supplemented by the online music education resource ‘Charanga’
  • Weekly whole school singing assemblies where we sing songs we love!
  • Half termly focus for the assembly entrance and exit music where we listen to a wide variety of music from different genres.
  • Annual performance for every Year group at Christmas
  • End of school performance for all Year 2 children each summer
  • Annual visit from performers in the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra (through SoundStorm Subscription) – whole school performance followed by question and answer sessions
  • Opportunities for children to learn to play instruments and sing through Rock Steady
Knowledge Acquiring – explore, find out, discover, research, understand
  • develop their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes
  • explore technique and sound-making on tuned and untuned instruments
  • listen with concentration and understanding to a range of live and recorded music
  • experiment with, create, select and combine sounds using the inter-related dimensions of music
Skills Development – problem solve, justify, reason, evaluate, practise
  •  practise and develop technique and confidence when playing instruments and singing
  • investigate and change sounds on instruments and those made with the voice
  • play from simple notations e.g. pictorial
  • listen with attention and respond to different kinds of music appropriately, using musical vocabulary and with an awareness of the needs of other listeners
  • respond to music through other art forms, dance, painting etc.
Sequence of Learning – When and how do we facilitate this learning for Musicians in our school?
Reception Year 1 Year 2
During each of the half termly projects, children will be exposed to the language and skills linked to the dimensions of music.  Across the year children will have opportunities to learn about, respond, explore and experiment with pitch, duration, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture and structure.  Through continuous provision children will be taught skills during adult led sessions.  They will have opportunities in both the outside and inside environments to explore and experiment with a variety of percussion instruments and develop the foundations of simple composition.  They will learn a repertoire of songs and rhymes and be able to sing with enjoyment and confidence using their voices in different ways.  Children will learn about Rimsky Korsakof as part of their Animal Adventure project responding through art to ‘The Flight of the Bumble Bee’.  Children will learn how to sequence, organise and order sounds to accompany the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears during their Teddy Bears Picnic project. Children will continue to develop confidence in the language and skills relating to all dimensions of music across the year.  Children in Year 1 will have a particular focus on the development and understanding of pitch, tempo and timbre.  During the Shake, Rattle and Roll project, children will make untuned instruments and perform to an audience focusing on pitch and timbre in their presentation. The Magic Toys dance focus in Autumn 2 enables children to respond to music in movement.  Tempo will be the focus for the Mudeford Bake Off project when children will be exploring instruments to make sound effects for the sounds of the kitchen e.g. whisking (fast) and rolling (slow) developing this for their own compositions.  Children will learn about and respond to the music of Holst through art, focusing on ‘The Planets’ during their Destination Unknown project. Children will learn how to sequence, organise and order sounds recognising simple musical structures e.g. beginnings and endings to accompany the Dinosaur Stomp song during their Dinosaur Rumpus project. Children will have a good understanding of the seven dimensions of music and will be able to use the language confidently and accurately.  Children in Year 2 will have a particular focus on the development and understanding of texture, duration, dynamics and pitch.  During the Brilliant Britain project children will develop playing techniques and create musical patterns.  They will explore names and place names as starting points for musical patterns, exploring the sounds of transport for our musical journeys and creating whole class musical compositions on the classroom instruments.  During this project children will also respond to music in movement through the story of Handa’s Surprise and learn about the music of Adele as a modern British composer.  During the Art Beat project children will develop skills in duration and dynamics through pictorial notation to represent changes in volume and speed including opportunities for independent composition.  The end of year performances will provide children with the opportunity to perform to an audience and demonstrate their skills in maintaining pitch.  Children will learn how to sequence, organise and order sounds recognising simple musical structures e.g. beginnings, middles and endings to accompany the Sea Shanties during their Pirate Island project.
Aims of a Musician leaving our school
Children will:

  • name some well-known composers and recognise some well-known pieces of music by those composers
  • respond to different types of music in different ways and express an opinion on them, using appropriate vocabulary
  • recognise and name a variety of classroom and other instruments
  • explain the differences between different groups of musicians eg. pop band, orchestra using appropriate vocabulary
  • explain how different sounds are made on different kinds of instruments
Physical Education

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PSHE

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Religious Education

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